Category Archives: mind

BLIPLE: The App that Makes Reflex Tests Fun

blipple app reviewThere have been many studies since the emergence of mobile phones that have aimed to show the extents to which using our phones can distract the brain, as well as how they can be detrimental to the cognitive development of children, but just as there are these studies, there are also many developers who have aimed to turn mobile phones into tools that we can use to train our brains.

My Talk at the 2013 Quantified Self Conference

my QS conference presentation picAs promised, posting today the slides of my “100 Days of Summer” talk that I presented at the 2013 Quantified Self conference in San Francisco last Thursday (October 10). In this presentation, I shared most important and interesting results of the first phase of Measured Me project.

My Lifestream Dashboard is Now Up!

My Quantified Summer lifestream is now up! I plan to update it every 7-10 days. Check it out here or by clicking MY LIFESTREAM on the main menu of my blog.

Tracking Willpower and Self-Control: Updated with Charts

how to measure and track willpower self-restraint and self-control(This is an updated version of previous post about tracking willpower, with interactive charts). Winslow Strong of Biohack Yourself (check out his awesome blog, by the way!) recently posted a great question on Quantified Self Facebook page, asking about ways to quantify restraint. This is when I remembered about my attempt to track willpower in March that was partially inspired by our conversation with Hiren Patel of Becoming the Best (another awesome blog!).  My method for tracking willpower (self-restraint/self-control) was rather simple and straightforward.

Tracking Willpower and Self-Restraint

how to measure and track willpower self-restraint and self-controlWinslow Strong of Biohack Yourself (check out his awesome blog, by the way!) recently posted a great question on Quantified Self Facebook page, asking about ways to quantify restraint. This is when I remembered about my attempt to track willpower in March that was partially inspired by our conversation with Hiren Patel of Becoming the Best (another awesome blog!).  My method for tracking willpower (self-restraint/self-control) was rather simple and straightforward.

My Attempt at Tracking Creativity

How to Track CreativityThe pursuit of creativity and self-expression are among the personal values that influence my happiness. Unfortunately, most of the creativity tests that exist today require you to perform certain tasks (e.g., solve a problem, draw something, etc.), involve other people rating your performance, and thus are not suitable for everyday self-tracking. I needed something more simple and more general, so one of my Quantified Self challenges this year was to develop a method to measure and track my creativity on a regular basis. After several unsuccessful tests in January-February, I finally ended up with a 4-question measure that may have a great potential.

Exploring Stress Through Self-Tracking

tracking stressIn an attempt to understand what causes psychological stress and how it affects quality of my life, I have been tracking its various sources. Contemporary stress theory recognizes three major types of stressors: intrapersonal (my personal thoughts, emotions, inner conflicts, etc.), interpersonal(relationships and interactions with other people, and non-personal (weather, workload, time constraints,  etc.). I have been rating exposure to each of these stressors three times a day throughout March, using 10-point scale in my rTracker log. The objective was to find out what kind of stressors bother me most often, my sensitivity to each of them, and how stressors influence my everyday psychological states and behavior. This week, I finally had a chance to aggregate all that data, and run some quick analysis.

Tracking Self-Esteem

tracking self esteemSelf-esteem refers to individual’s emotional evaluation of his/her own worth and personal abilities and capacities. Psychologists believe that self-esteem influences how we feel, act and relate to other people, which makes it one of the central concepts in positive psychology. In general, self-esteem considered to be a trait (a psychological construct that is relatively stable over-time, like personality characteristics), although some psychologists recognize also more short-terms expressions of self-esteem (self-esteem states). I have been tracking my self-esteem since February, and this week finally had a chance to look at the data. I was particularly interested to see its stability over time and throughout the day, and how self-esteem is related to everyday stress, mood and happiness.

Update On My Waking Mood Experiment (March)

Can Waking Up Mood Predict Your Day Measured MeCan you predict your day based on how you feel immediately upon waking up? In an attempt to replicate Sami Inken’s analysis, I have been rating my mood every morning within 15 minutes of waking up, and then three times throughout the day: in the morning (around 11 a.m.), afternoon (around 5 p.m.), and evening (around 10 p.m.). After about a month of tracking (22 days of data), I looked at the correlations, and the results were rather disappointing.

My Quantified Self Projects and Self-Experiments in March

measured me experiments in marchThe March is almost over, so I thought it is a good time to tell what kind of things I am have been tracking and what self-experiments I have been conducting this month. As usual, at the end of the month I will export data from my rTracker log , analyze it and will share any interesting insights and findings with you.