Category Archives: environment

Quantifying Thermal Comfort of Your Clothes

quantified self tracking clothes insulation metricsDid you know that there is a standard measurement unit called “clo” that is used to quantify the thermal comfort/insulation of the clothing? Its values ranges from 0 (naked person) to 1 (insulating value of clothing needed to maintain a person in comfort sitting at rest in a room at 21 ℃, or 70 ℉). This interesting article provides a simple calculator that you can use to get the total clo-score for your clothes. You can get a more specific breakdown for various items here.

Image Credit: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

My Talk at the 2013 Quantified Self Conference

my QS conference presentation picAs promised, posting today the slides of my “100 Days of Summer” talk that I presented at the 2013 Quantified Self conference in San Francisco last Thursday (October 10). In this presentation, I shared most important and interesting results of the first phase of Measured Me project.

Quantifying Situational and Environmental Context

how to measure situations and situational contextIn this post, I would like to share some preliminary findings of my attempts at quantifying and tracking everyday situational and environmental context. Specifically, I will explain how I have been logging everyday situations and environment, and will talk about some interesting patterns that I found in my data.

My Lifestream Dashboard is Now Up!

My Quantified Summer lifestream is now up! I plan to update it every 7-10 days. Check it out here or by clicking MY LIFESTREAM on the main menu of my blog.

Tracking Chaos in My Life

tracking entropy in everyday life by measured me blogThe ultimate purpose of self-tracking, in my opinion, is control. Control over health conditions, performance, mood, and other aspects of your everyday life. To paraphrase the famous adage, we measure so we could manage. We also measure things that we can’t manage (e.g., weather). Because self-discovery through self-tracking leads to knowledge, and knowledge is another form of control. Or at least, it gives us a sense of control.  But how much of our everyday life we can actually control? How this lack of control affects our everyday life? To some of us, these questions may sound philosophical, but I believe the answers can be found in our own data. In February and March, I have been tracking “entropy” in my everyday life: those occasions when things go beyond my control, and happen exclusively due to some external forces. The ultimate objective was to investigate to what extent such random uncontrollable events influence different aspects of my life.

My Quantified Self Projects and Self-Experiments in March

measured me experiments in marchThe March is almost over, so I thought it is a good time to tell what kind of things I am have been tracking and what self-experiments I have been conducting this month. As usual, at the end of the month I will export data from my rTracker log , analyze it and will share any interesting insights and findings with you.

Moon Phases and Quantified Self

quantified self tracking the moon effectsOk, some of you may find this post a bit unorthodox. I was always curious to see if the moon has any effect on my behavior and psychological states. While a traditional researcher inside me still has doubts about this kind of “analytics”, I still went ahead and crunched some numbers, just for fun. Using my September and October data, I analyzed the cyclical patterns and differences in my sleep quality, mood, and stress across four moon phases (new moon, first quarter, full moon, last quarter).  Interestingly, there were some notable differences in mood and sleep during full moon and new moon phases. 

Tracking Impact of Weather On Your Life

personal analytics analyzing impact of weather on your life self-tracking life loggingIt is a well known fact that weather can influence various aspects of our everyday lives, including physical and mental health, productivity, performance, social behavior, etc. Sometimes, the connection is direct and obvious. For instance, extreme temperature fluctuations have been shown to affect our immune systems, and the quality of air is directly linked to asthma and allergies. More than often, however, the weather effects are peculiar and more subtle. The heat, for example, has been linked to aggression and violence. Certain kinds of wind has been shown to negatively affect human behavior and psyche (e.g., the foehn in Swiss Alps, or khamsin in Middle East). A lot of people (including myself) report sleeping better at nights when it rains or snows. I personally tend to experience mild depression on cloudy and rainy days, while plenty of sunshine usually affects my mood positively. Naturally, the only way to see if any particular weather aspect actually affects your life, and to what extent would be to include it in your self-tracking routine, and then analyze the hypothesized patterns. So for the past couple of weeks I have been looking for a way to incorporate weather data into my tracking logs, and in today’s post, would like to share my current findings and potential quantified-self research ideas.

Why I am Doing This?

measured me blog quantified self personal analytics personal informatics self experimentation In market research, we often use term “actionable analytics”. This means that you collect data and then analyze it with the intention to use results to solve real life problems. In other words, your analysis should result in some kind of action or decision. Likewise, in my case self-tracking is not about narcissism. It’s about studying myself to be happier, healthier, more efficient, productive and successful. My current self-tracking efforts emphasize certain aspects of my life that I am trying to improve, and in this post I will briefly describe what I am trying to achieve.